Suvadin, Home
Nepal Life Insurance Ltd.
It was a year after my mother died at the grand age of 96 that my sister decided to do something with the letters. A big bag of letters, some loose and some tied together in bundles with red ribbon. Our mother had said that when she died we should throw the ones in ribbon away as they were personal letters, love letters from my father.

It was a year after my mother died at the grand age of 96 that my sister decided to do something with the letters. A big bag of letters, some loose and some tied together in bundles with red ribbon. Our mother had said that when she died we should throw the ones in ribbon away as they were personal letters, love letters from my father.

Before she started to destroy the letters my sister thought that my two sons might be interested in the old stamps on the envelopes some of which were very old as my mother had known and had been writing to my father for 74 years. As she carefully removed the letters from the envelopes. She noticed that one letter simply said "and some sausages". How strange! It wasn't until she found another letter with a list of groceries that she understood the first. In 1938 there were four, yes four postal deliveries each day.

 My father worked in the post office and my mother had sent him the first letter with the shopping to be done on his way home but had forgotten one vital ingredient for the evening dinner - sausages. I guess these days we would just be able to send a text, the modern equivalent to four deliveries of post.

 

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